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WorldGuide (2005-2016) was a luxury lifestyle book, then website providing independent advice on what to buy, where to stay, where to dine, and what to do when visiting locations across the globe. Tales from the Road was my adventure travel page hosted by WorldGuide.

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Tales from the Road is WorldGuide's adventure travel page

Tales from the Road
 

Burmese days on the road to Mandalay: No longer the British colony referred to in George Orwell's novel, Burmese Days, or Rudyard Kipling's poem, Mandalay, the Burmese have yet to free themselves from the ties that bind them, but they seem ready.

How to "eat" right in Halkidiki, Greece: Now that you're eating right, are you sure that you're eating right?

Three days in the souks: The bustle and confusion of Moroccan bazaars can be overwhelming to the senses at first, but one does not come to Morocco for clarity. Becoming engulfed in Fez’s medina is key to the wonder and experience.

Titillations of antiquity in open-air theatre: "What we do in life echoes in eternity." So says General Maximus in the Ridley Scott film Gladiator (2000). It's a poignant thought, standing in Verona's Arena, the largest, best preserved open-air amphitheatre in the world.

Tweeting through Costa Rica the old-fashioned way:The number one country on the Happy Planet Index, the greenest country on Earth and en route to becoming carbon-neutral within a decade, Costa Rica has something even more interesting to offer: birds. 

Belize — small in size, big in beauty: Belize is a country with a small land mass and tiny population. Its bigness lies in its abundant natural beauty – on land, on water and under the surface too.

River cruising in the Mekong Delta: Southeast Asia was influenced first by China and India, then by French colonialism in the 19th and 20th centuries, then by literally decades of war. With its doors reopened to tourism, what's Indochina like now?

Atacama, a desert of surprises: Supposedly the driest desert on earth, the Atacama presents a world of colour, oases and wildlife that will surprise even the most sceptical traveller.

Namibia's unspoiled wilderness: Namibia encompasses many varied landscapes, each one dramatically different from the other. It is a land of big spaces, few inhabitants and natural beauty – a perfect place for wilderness safaris.

Rapa Nui, a Pacific Ocean island of mystery: Easter Island is the most isolated island on earth and famous for its giant stone heads, yet surprisingly little is known about the culture that created them. Island artefacts reveal much, but conceal even more.

The Birdman Cult of Rapa Nui: Climb freestyle down a cliff, swim through shark infested waters, survive attacks from competitors and get the egg – that's the Birdman competition that took place on Easter Island for nearly 200 years. But why?

Chasing Dracula: History, culture, evil spirits and the living dead − Romania has it all if you know where to look.

Toronto, Hollywood North: TIFF is one of the most significant film festivals in the world. It draws thousands of visitors, big name celebrities and up and coming producers and directors who all have one thing in common: a love of film.

Day trips from Tiberias in northern Israel: Ancient sea ports and Jesus' ministry, Israel has much to offer besides its famous southern elements of Jerusalem, desert and dead waters.

Jerusalem — city of fervour: One of the oldest cities on earth, violence has plagued much of its existence. Even today, Palestinians and Israelis are still struggling over jurisdiction of historic and religious rights...

Brazilian Carnival, but not the one you're thinking of: Only 35 kilometres from São Paulo, on the eve of Carnival each year in one of Brazil's most ancient cities, thousands of residents wait in anxious anticipation for Grito da Noite (Scream Night) to begin.

The Galapagos — island paradise or no man's land?: This archipelago of volcanic islands 972 kilometres off the coast of mainland Ecuador is famous for inspiring Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, but there are more characters in the Galapagos' history worth knowing about. 

Scuba diving in the Red Sea: Leaving the chaos of Cairo’s airport for the tranquillity of Sharm el Sheikh’s is rewarding, but leaving Sharm’s artificial oasis for some of the best diving in the world – in the Red Sea – is the big payoff. Here’s why.

Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil — the Great Waters: This exceptionally beautiful waterfall horseshoe in South America is shared by Brazil and Argentina. Named "The Great Waters" by the local Tupi Guarani Indians, these falls are a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Búzios – from fishing village to famous beach resort: Back in the 1600s, fishermen of Armação dos Búzios, a quaint little village 170 km (105 miles) north of Rio de Janeiro, were whale hunting specialists. They built houses along a narrow strip of beach, now called Praia...

Petra — the rock and much more: Petra, one of the seven wonders of the world and a UNESCO World Heritage Site, remains uniquely fascinating after thousands of years. Visiting it today, however, is easier than it was a few millennia ago. Or is it?

Cave exploring in the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest: Brazil's south-eastern Atlantic Rainforest offers some of the best opportunities for cave exploration in the country. Brazil's safety measures do not overwhelm, however, so be ready for some real adventure.

1930's Rail Travel for the Leisured Elite: If you're thinking Orient Express, forget it. Think bigger, better and slower. Rovos Rail boasts the most luxurious trains in the world: The Pride of Africa.

 A good travel piece is fun, informative and factual,
not a place for hackneyed embellishments.
Do contact me to discuss bringing improbable journeys into the realm of possibility for your readership.

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